Language Level 2

  • Two Characteristics and Barrier Games

    Total sales: 1 pcs. $25.95 inc. GST

    Level 2

    Attending to two characteristics Level 2 “Find something that is ... and ... .” “Show me one that has ... and ... .” Understanding the function of objects Level 2 “Show me something that you can ... and has ... .” “Find one that is for ... and has ... .” Attending to two characteristics - This activity will help your child to focus on two features of an object, animal or person. It is important to make sure that your child recognises and is able to name each picture on the page before you ask him to select an item according to your description. While many children are able to recognise subtle characteristics of objects, animals or people, others may need further support to be able to attend to two characteristics at one time. Therefore, before giving your instructions, you may wish to spend some time exploring and talking about each item on the page Barrier Games - The aim of a barrier game is for one player (the Speaker) to describe his picture whilst the other player (the Listener), recreates an identical picture. The pictures are compared and adjusted (if required) after completion. A barrier is placed between the players. Two Characteristics Find the one that lands on water and flies. Show me the one that lands on a runway and flies. . Barrier Games Put the one that has seats and can fly next to the waterfall. Put the one that has a beak and can fly below the volcano.
  • Functions Lotto

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $39.95 inc. GST

    Level 2

    Naming the functions of objects Level 2 “What do we do with this?” “What is a ... for?” “What do we use this for?” Citing an example within a category Level 2 “Yesterday I bought something to eat.  What could I have bought?” “My naughty dog chewed my clothes.  What clothes did he chew?” These worksheets are targeted at  Level 2 of Marion Blank’s 'Model of Classroom Language'.  The activities will help your child understand the function of objects, what the objects are used for and what we do with them. Function - describes ...
    • What we do with something (eat cake).
    • What we use it for (cut with scissors).
    • What it does or what it can do (a helicopter flies, a bee can sting).
    This program ensures that your child will be able to ...
    • Select objects according to their function.
    • Sort objects with similar functions.
    • Name the functions of objects.
    • Identify the odd one out by recognising the object’s function.
    Research indicates that we store and retrieve words more easily if they have been organised into ‘groups’.  Classifying is an important skill for a child to learn.  Understanding the function of objects is generally the first characteristic that a child attaches to an object.  Your child will quickly realise that juice is for drinking and that a bed is for sleeping in. This program will help to increase your child’s vocabulary and improve his retrieval of words by creating an awareness that objects have functions.  Working through these activity sheets will assist your child to understand the functions and uses of objects.  As you work through this program, it is important that your questions and statements are adjusted so that your conversation is kept within your child’s skill level.  If your child does not appear to understand you, or he responds inappropriately to your question or statement, you should talk more about the task, the activities or objects.  This will help to increase your child’s understanding of the conversation or task.  Your language should always be explicit.  You should not assume that your child will be able to imply something from your statement unless you have explained it fully.  If your child understands the instruction, he is more likely to attend to the task and if successful, will maintain his confidence and feel encouraged to participate in further activities
  • Sorting Functions

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $29.95 inc. GST

    Level 2

    Sorting the Functions of Objects Level 2 “What do you do with a ...?" “What do you use a ... for?” “Find me something that you can ... with.” "Find all the ones that I can wear." "Find something that I can ride on." All Wise Words Language programs are underpinned by Marion Blank’s 'Model of Classroom Language'. This program will target Level 2 questions and statements. A Level 2 question requires your child to direct her attention to the material directly in front of her, but at the same time she will need to focus more selectively on this material. Recognising the function of objects is an early concept for children. By using these worksheets, you will help your child understand how objects can be used and what objects can be used for. In addition to identifying objects which match the named function, your child is also encouraged to describe the use of the objects in their selection. Each page contains three different functions with each function represented by three different objects.  
  • Naming Functions

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $25.95 inc. GST

    Level 2

    Naming the Functions of Objects Level 2 “What do we do with this?” “What is a ... for?” “What do we use a ... for?” Completing a Sentence Level 2 “You finish what I say .. " "I kick a ...” “I eat ...” “... is for eating” These worksheets are targeted at Level 2. The activities will help your child understand the function of objects, what objects are used for and what we do with them. Research indicates that we store and retrieve words more easily if they have been organised into “collections”. Classifying is an important skill for a child to learn. Understanding the function of objects is generally the first characteristic that a child attaches to an object. Your child will quickly realise that juice is for drinking and that a bed is for sleeping in. This program ensures that your child will be able to:
    • Select objects according to their function.
    • Sort objects with similar functions.
    • Name the functions of objects.
    • Identify the odd one out by recognising the object’s function.
  • Matching Functions

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $39.95 inc. GST

    Level 2

    Naming functions of objects Level 2 “What do you do with bubbles?” → “I blow bubbles.” “What do you use a pillow for?” → “I sleep on a pillow.” Completing a sentence Level 2 “I cut with a ...” “I wear a...” "I blow ..." Recognising the function of objects is an early concept for children. These worksheets will be useful for teaching your child how objects are used and what they are used for.  Recognising the function of objects is an early concept for children. These worksheets will be useful for teaching your child how objects are used and what they are used for. Four objects are placed on the left of each page and the matching four functions are represented on the right of the page. Your child will learn to match the action with the appropriate object and alternatively match the object with its function. This program will help your child to increase their vocabulary and understanding of verbs (action words). You will encourage your child to ‘make a sentence’ for each object they match to an action. (“I cut with a knife.”) Example of a task/activity Give your child a pencil and ask him/her to find the pictures that match. Point to the object on the left side of the page and ask: “What do you do with a knife?” “I cut with a knife.” Encourage your child to draw a line to match the object with its function. Now point to the next picture on the left side of the page and ask: “What do you do with a pillow?” “I sleep on a pillow.” Again ask your child to draw a line to match the object with its function. Continue in this manner until you have matched each object with its matching action (verb).
  • Functions – Board Games

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $29.95 inc. GST

    Level 2

    Identifying objects according to their function/use Level 2 ““What do you use … for?” “What do you use to ...?” “What do you do with a ...?” “Find something that you can…” Scanning for an object defined by its function Level 2 “Find something that you can dig with.” “Show me something that I can use to ...” “Point to the ones that I can drink.” “Touch the ones that you can drive.” This program provides opportunities to teach more verbs and help children understand that objects have functions - Playing the games provided in this program will increase your child’s command of verbs (action words) and help to expand his/her vocabulary and sentences. Working through the provided activities will help your child understand the link between objects and functions and will ensure that he/she remains engaged in the presented tasks. Research indicates that vocabulary size is a major contributor to language development. It is important for children to make a meaningful connection between an object and an action and thus expand their vocabulary. Verbs lay the foundation for the meaning of early sentences. Providing additional connections such as understanding functions, helps a child learn and find words in a more timely manner. Example of a game: This This game does not require a die. The movement cards describe an action. These cards are cut up and placed face down in a pile next to the board. Each player takes turns to pick up a card from the pile, saying the words ... “Move to something that you can ...” The player moves his/her counter to the first square on the track which matches the action card selected. Cards are placed in the discard pile after each turn. When all the cards have been discarded, the stack should be turned over and the players continue drawing cards from the pile, creating a sentence and moving to a matching object until one player reaches the finish.
  • Semantic Naming

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $25.95 inc. GST

    Level 2

    Citing and grouping an object within a category Level 2 “Find something that is a food." "Noodles, cheese, bread - which group do these belong in?" All Wise Words Language programs are underpinned by Marion Blank’s Model of Classroom Language. This program will target Level 2 type questions and statements.  Research indicates that we store and retrieve words more easily if they have been organised into “collections”.  Two important ways that we can organise words are according to: Function - (what we do with something (eat cake), what we use it for (cut with scissors) or what it does (a bird flies). Semantic Class - A “word family” which includes groups such as food (cake, eggs, bread, cheese), wild animals (zebra, giraffe, lion, monkey), furniture (chair, bed, table, shelves). These worksheets have been designed to help your child recognise Semantic Categories. Your child will learn to group objects into categories and they will learn to use category labels. Example of an activity: Point to the first row of objects on the page.  Encourage or help your child name each object. Say: “What group do these belong in?” “vegetable” Now ask your child to find the picture of the vegetable group and place it next to the row of vegetables. Next ask your child: “Can you tell me another vegetable?” or “Can you find me a different vegetable?” “corn” If your child cannot recall an alternative vegetable to the three already depicted, you may wish to offer him/her a choice of three other objects .... "Is a giraffe a vegetable?" "Is a train a vegetable?" "Is corn a vegetable?  Yes, corn is a vegetable and corn belongs in the vegetable group."
  • Semantic Families

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $29.95 inc. GST

    Level 2

    Naming and grouping an object within a category “Find something that is a food." "Hamburger - which group does this belong in?” “Is this in the furniture group?” “Which group are you collecting?” “What belongs in your group?” Attending to two characteristics “Find something that gives milk and eats grass.” “Find something that is an animal and has a long neck.” “Find the things that grow and we can eat.” This program provides opportunities to teach the concept of semantic groups/grouping of objects. - Children learn new words more easily if they fully understand the meaning of a word. Therefore, it is important for the child to understand the semantic features and how a word can be categorised. Initially he is required to group non-identical but almost the same objects. The semantic features and similarities of each object are discussed and sorted using the ‘Group Board’. This activity gives the child a number of links to the non-identical objects (cars) or group name (e.g. fruit, transport). Discussing and comparing the semantic features of objects provides a ‘mapping’ experience to ensure that the word is learnt more successfully. This program can also be used to target and identify similarities or differences while providing the child with additional information to use inductive reasoning. Research indicates that we store and retrieve words more easily if they have been organised into ‘collections’. Two important ways that we can organise words are by ... • Function - what we do with something (eat cake), what we use it for (cut with - scissors) or what it does (a bird flies). • Semantic Class - A ‘word family’ includes groups such as food (cake, eggs, bread, cheese), wild animals (zebra, giraffe, lion, monkey), furniture (chair, bed, table, shelves). This program targets the classification of objects into Semantic Classes whilst providing the child with multiple links which they can use to retrieve the words at a later time. Initially the child is presented with objects which are similar (all balls) but not identical (e.g. football, tennis ball, bowling ball, basketball). Once a child is able to group non-identical objects into groups, the Semantic Class cards and boards are presented (e.g. food, furniture, clothes, farm animals). Contents - 34 pages including instructions.
  • Semantic Sorting

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $29.95 inc. GST

    Level 2

    Naming a Semantic Class Level 2 “Hamburger, cheese and bread are all ...?” “What group do hamburger,cheese and bread belong in?” “I went shopping and I saw some food.” “What food could I have seen?” Sorting According to Semantic Class Level 2 “Find all the food.” “Find something that is a food.” “Show me all the food.” All Wise Words Language programs are underpinned by Marion Blank’s “Model of Classroom Language”. This program will target Level 2 questions and statements. The activities in this program will help your child to sort materials into groups and use the collective group name for objects. Research indicates that we store and retrieve words more easily if they have been organised into “collections”. Two important ways that we can organize words are according to: Function - what we do with something (eat cake) Semantic Class - A “word family” which includes groups such as food (cake, eggs, bread) This program will focus your child’s attention on the concept of Semantic Groups. He/she will learn how to group objects into categories and how to use category labels. Three semantic groups are represented on each page and your child is required to identify the objects which belong in a specific semantic group. Example of an activity: Give your child a coloured pencil and ask him/her to find all the farm animals.  Your child will circle and name each farm animal as he/she finds it on the page. Next, give your child a different coloured pencil and ask him/her to find all the fruit. Now give your child another coloured pencil and ask your child to find all the clothes.
  • Semantic Matching

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $39.95 inc. GST

    Level 2

    Naming and grouping an object within a category “Find something that is a food." "Hamburger - which group does this belong in?” “Is it the furniture group?” “Which group are you collecting?” “What belongs in your group?” Citing an Example within a Category “Name something that is a food." "Tell me something that belongs in the kitchen.” “Find something that is a farm animal.” “Point to something that belongs in the sky.” Contents/product description - Research indicates that we store and retrieve words more easily if the words are arranged into ‘collections’. Two important ways that we can sort and group words are by ...
    • Function - what we do with something (eat cake), what we use it for (cut with scissors) or what it does (a bird flies).
    • Semantic Class - A ‘word family’ which includes groups such as food (cake, eggs, bread, cheese), wild animals (zebra, giraffe, lion, monkey), furniture (chair, bed, table, shelves).
    This program will help to increase your child’s vocabulary by introducing him to the concept of sorting words into groups and labelling these groups. Four objects are placed on the left of each page and the matching four semantic groups are represented on the right of the page. Your child is asked to name each object or category as you point to it. If your child does not know the word/s or cannot find the word in a timely manner, you should name the picture for your child and encourage him to imitate you. You may need to cover all but two pictures on the right of the page to help your child select the correct group. It may be necessary to talk further to help your child make the correct selection ... “Can you wear cheese? Is cheese in the clothes group? Can you eat cheese? Is cheese a food?” Example of a task/activity When your child has made the correct selection, encourage him to describe the object and its class as he/she draws the line to match the object to the correct group ... • “Cheese is a food. Cheese belongs in the food group.” • “I can travel/ride in a tow truck.  A tow truck belongs in the transport group.” • “An elephant is an animal. An elephant lives in the zoo/the wild.  An elephant belongs in the zoo animal group.” • “I can play with a puzzle.  A puzzle belongs in the toys group.”
  • Semantic Board Games

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $25.95 inc. GST

    Level 2

    Naming a semantic class Level 2 “A watermelon, a banana and an orange are all ...?” “What group do toes, eyeballs and shoulders belong in?” “I went shopping for new clothes.  What did I buy?” Sorting according to a semantic class Level 2 “Find all the vegetables.” “Find something that is an insect.” “Show me all the farm animals.” Citing an example within a category Level 2 “Name something that is a drink.” “Tell me something that is a vegetable.” “Show me something that belongs in the transport group.” “I went to the zoo. Tell me something that I saw at the zoo.” Contents/product description - This program targets Blank’s Level 2 questions and statements. Playing the games provided in this program will help your child to understand that objects can be grouped into categories and that categories have labels (fruit, vegetables, clothes, tools, zoo animals). Playing a number of different games all targeting the same language goal will further stablise these concepts whilst ensuring that your child is engaged. Research indicates that we store and retrieve words more easily if they have been organised into ‘collections’. Working through these activities will help to increase your child’s vocabulary and improve his/her word finding skills. A child may ‘know’ a word and he may point to the appropriate object when it is named but he may not be able to retrieve the word at all or be able to retrieve the word in a timely manner.  Playing the games in this program will  be enjoyable for your child and should ensure that he/she repeats the tasks numerous times which will help him/her fully understand the concept.
  • Semantic Lotto

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $39.95 inc. GST

    Level 2

    Citing and grouping an object within a category Level 2 “Find something that is a food." "Hamburger - which group does this belong in?" "Is it the furniture group?” “Which group are you collecting?” “What belongs in your group?” Attending to two characteristics Level 2 “Find something that is round and is a food." "Noodles, cheese, bread - which group do these belong in? “Find something that is an animal and has a long neck.” Level 2 questions require your child to direct their attention on the material directly in front of them, but at the same time he/she will need to focus more selectively on this material.  Research indicates that we store and retrieve words more easily if they have been organised into 'collections'.  Two important ways that we can organise words are according to: Function - what we do with something (eat cake), what we use it for (cut with scissors) or what it does (a bird flies). Semantic Class - A 'word family' which includes groups such as food (cake, eggs, bread, cheese), wild animals (zebra, giraffe, lion, monkey), furniture (chair, bed, table, shelves). The activities in this program will help your child to sort materials into semantic groups and use the collective group name for objects.  For example: clothes - jumper, jeans, shirt, socks, dress, singlet fruit - apple, banana, orange, pineapple, grapes, watermelon The lotto boards, individual object cards and group cards can be used in a number of different activities and games. Varying the task will ensure that your child remains engaged and focused on the activities, whilst repeating the task several times.
  • Identifying Parts of a Whole and Exclusions

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $39.95 inc. GST

    Levels 2 - 4

    Attending to Two Characteristics Naming the Parts of Objects Identifying an Object by its Function Level 2 “Find something that is round and we can eat.” “What is this part of a ... called?” “What do we use this for?” Selecting an Object by Exclusion Selecting a Set of Objects by Exclusion Level 3 “Find all the ones that are not animals." "Tell me something that is not big." “Show me something that can jump but is not a horse." Reasoning and Problem Solving Level 4 “If a bicycle wheel were square would it still be a wheel?” “Why are gumboots made of rubber?” “What will happen if ...?” "Why is a raincoat called a raincoat?" The first part of this program has been designed to help your child recognise and name parts of objects and respond to questions which focus on the object's properties and functions. (eg Selecting an object according to two characteristics – “Find the one that has an engine and wings.”) The second part of this program targets exclusion.  This requires your child to overcome the urge to respond to a key word or salient perceptual material. (eg “Point to something that you can eat but isn’t round.  Find something that flies in the sky but doesn't have wings.”) The final part of this program represents complex verbal problems that require a child to reason about what may, might, could or would happen to material/objects under specific circumstances. Your child will need to problem solve and formulate solutions using logic and past knowledge. Although the question may relate to an object pictured on the page, the solution to the question is not present. Example of tasks/activities Level 2 Find something round which we can eat. What's this part of a helicopter called? Level 3 Point to something that you can eat but isn't round. Point to something that is a boat but doesn't have sails. Level 4 Why isn't a beach ball made of wood? Would a soccer ball still be a soccer ball if it were an oval shape?
  • Identifying Similarities and Differences

    Total sales: 0 pcs. $39.95 inc. GST

    Level 2 and Level 3

    Identifying Differences Level 2 “Which one is different?" "Which one is not the same?" "Which one doesn’t match?" "How are these different?" Identifying Similarities Level 3 “How are these the same?" The first activity (Level 2) will help your child to identify differences and be able to explain how something is different. This is an important skill as it directs the child’s attention to further aspects or properties of an item. This Level 2 question is simpler than the more complex question “How are these the same?” The second activity (Level 3) will help your child to identify similarities within a group of objects. This is an important skill for children to acquire as they are often able to recognise differences between objects and yet they cannot always explain how objects can share similarities. This Level 3 question is more complex because now your child has to perceive similarities between objects which may, or may not, be obvious or immediately perceived . Example of a Level 2 Activity Ask your child to point to and name the objects: “Dog, duck, pig, sheep, horse” Now ask: “Which one is different?” - "Duck" If your child points to the correct item but does not verbalise, she should be encouraged to name the item. - “duck.” Point to the duck and ask: “How is it different?” - “The duck is white. The other animals are grey.” Point to the duck and ask: “How is it different?” - “The duck is white.  The other animals are grey.” Example of a Level 3 Activity Ask your child to point to and name the objects: "Needle, knife, scissors, apron, saw"  Now cover the apron with card and whilst pointing to the remaining objects ask: "How are these the same?" - “These are sharp.  An apron isn't sharp.”