Language Level 3

  • Parts of a Whole and Exclusions

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    Identifying Parts of a Whole and Exclusions Level 2 - 4

    Attending to Two Characteristics Naming the Parts of Objects Identifying an Object by its Function Level 2 “Find something that is round that we can eat.” “What is this part of a ... called?” “What do we use this for?” Selecting an Object by Exclusion Selecting a Set of Objects by Exclusion Level 3 “Find all the ones that are not animals." "Tell me something that is not big." “Show me something that can jump but is not a horse." Reasoning and Problem Solving Level 4 “If a bicycle wheel were square would it still be a wheel?” “Why are gumboots made of rubber?” “What will happen if ...?” "Why is a raincoat called a raincoat?" The first part of this program has been designed to help your child recognise and name parts of objects and respond to questions which focus on the object's properties and functions. (eg Selecting an object according to two characteristics – “Find the one that has an engine and wings.”) The second part of this program targets exclusion. This requires your child to overcome the urge to respond to a key word or salient perceptual material. (eg “Point to something that you can eat but isn’t round. Find something that flies in the sky but doesn't have wings.”) The final part of this program represents complex verbal problems that require a child to reason about what may, might, could or would happen to material/objects under specific circumstances. Your child will need to problem solve and formulate solutions using logic and past knowledge. Although the question may relate to an object pictured on the page, the solution to the question is not present. Examples of tasks/activities Level 2 Find something round which we can eat. What's this part of a helicopter called? Level 3 Point to something that you can eat but isn't round. Point to something that is a boat but doesn't have sails. Level 4 Why isn't a beach ball made of wood? Would a soccer ball still be a soccer ball if it were an oval shape?
  • Word Definitions – Mind Map 1

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    Level 3

    Defining Words Level 3 “What is a ...?” “Tell me what a ... is.” “Tell me what ... are.” Mind Maps will help your child to
    • Talk about and describe an object
    • Give 'news'
    • Expand his/her vocabulary
    • Find the right word
    • Increase his/her descriptive language
    • Answer questions
    • Ask questions
    Example of an activity: Using the specific prompts radiating out from the centre object, you can help your child define a word.  You may ask your child to place a counter on each prompt as he describes the object or he may prefer to trace along the line which leads to the prompt. "Tell me about a sheep." If your child does not respond, you should point to each picture prompt asking the relevant questions:
    • Where do you find it?
    • What does it do?  What can you do with it?
    • What shape is it?
    • What colour is it?
    • What group (semantic class) does it belong in?
    • What noise does it make?
    • What parts does it have?  (Labeling the parts of objects greatly increases a child's vocabulary.  For example - fleece, hooves of a sheep)
    • How does it feel (when touched)?
    • When your child becomes competent with the object specific prompts you should introduce the generic mind map which is provided at the end of the program.
    Three Sets of Mind Maps are available: Word Definitions Mind Map - Set 1 Word Definitions Mind Map - Set 2 Word Definitions Mind Map - Set 3 These sets are not arranged in order of difficulty. Each set consists of entirely different objects. Some children may need to work through all three sets before they achieve a competency in this task. Working through all three sets will greatly help to expand your child’s vocabulary.
  • Word Definitions – Mind Map 2

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    Level 3

    Defining Words Level 3 “What is a ...?” “Tell me what a ... is.” “Tell me what ... are.” Mind Maps  - will help your child to
    • Talk about and describe an object
    • Give 'news'
    • Expand his/her vocabulary
    • Find the right word
    • Increase his/her descriptive language
    • Answer questions
    • Ask questions
    Example of an activity: Using the specific prompts radiating out from the centre object you can help your child define a word. You may ask your child to place a counter on each prompt as he describes the object or he may prefer to trace along the line which leads to the prompt. "Tell me about a hamburger." If your child does not respond, you should point to each picture prompt asking the relevant questions:
    • Where do you find it?
    • What can you do with it?
    • What shape is it?
    • What colour is it?
    • What group (semantic class) does it belong in?
    • What parts does it have? (Labelling the parts of objects greatly increases a child's vocabulary. For example - yolk, white, shell)
    • How does it feel (when touched)?
    • When your child becomes competent with the specific prompts, a generic mind map is provided.
    Three Sets of Mind Maps are available: Word Definitions Mind Map - Set 1 Word Definitions Mind Map - Set 2 Word Definitions Mind Map - Set 3 These sets are not arranged in order of difficulty. Each set consists of entirely different objects. Some children may need to work through all three sets before they achieve a competency in this task. Working through all three sets will greatly help to expand your child’s vocabulary.
  • Word Definitions – Mind Map 3

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    Level 3

    Defining Words Level 3 “What is a ...?” “Tell me what a ... is.” “Tell me what ... are.” Mind Maps will help your child to
    • Talk about and describe an object
    • Give 'news'
    • Expand his/her vocabulary
    • Find the right word
    • Increase his/her descriptive language
    • Answer questions
    • Ask questions
    Example of an activity Using the specific prompts radiating out from the centre object you can help your child define a word. You may ask your child to place a counter on each prompt as he describes the object or he may prefer to trace along the line which leads to the prompt. "Tell me about an egg." If your child does not respond, you should point to each picture prompt asking the relevant questions:
    • Where do you find it?
    • How does it feel (when touched)?
    • What can you do with it?
    • What shape is it?
    • What colour is it?
    • What group (semantic class) does it belong in?
    What parts does it have? (Labelling the parts of objects greatly increases a child's vocabulary. For example - egg - yolk, white, shell) When your child becomes competent with the object specific prompts you should introduce the generic mind map which is provided at the end of the program Three Sets of Mind Maps are available: Word Definitions Mind Map - Set 1 Word Definitions Mind Map - Set 2 Word Definitions Mind Map - Set 3 These sets are not arranged in order of difficulty. Each set consists of entirely different objects. Some children may need to work through all three sets before they achieve competency in this task. Working through all three sets will greatly help to expand your child’s vocabulary.
  • Identifying Similarities and Differences

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    Level 2 and Level 3

    Identifying Differences Level 2 "Which one is different? Which one is not the same? Which one doesn’t match? How are these different? Identifying Similarities Level 3 “How are these the same? The first activity (Level 2) - will help your child to identify differences and be able to explain how something is different. This is an important skill as it directs the child’s attention to further aspects or properties of an item. This Level 2 question is simpler than the more complex question “How are these the same?” The second activity (Level 3)  will help your child to identify similarities within a group of objects. This is an important skill for children to acquire as they are often able to recognise differences between objects and yet they cannot always explain how objects can share similarities. This Level 3 question is more complex because now your child has to perceive similarities between objects which may, or may not, be obvious or immediately perceived. Example of a Level 2 Activity: Ask your child to point to and name the objects: “Dog, duck, pig, sheep, horse” Now ask: “Which one is different?” - "Duck" If your child points to the correct item but does not verbalise, she should be encouraged to name the item. - “duck.” Point to the duck and ask: “How is it different?” - “The duck is white. The other animals are grey.” Example of a Level 3 Activity: Ask your child to point to and name the objects: "Needle, knife, scissors, apron, saw" Now cover the apron with card and whilst pointing to the remaining objects ask: "How are these the same?" - “These are sharp. An apron isn't sharp.”
  • Selecting an Alternative

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    Level 3 (& Level 4)

    Selecting an Object or Set of Objects by Exclusion Level 3 “Tell me something else that ...” “Tell me something different that ..." "Show me the things that aren’t ...” “Point to the things that don’t ...” “Find the things that the boy can’t ...” Reasoning & Problem Solving Level 4 “Why is a ... made of ...?" "What should he do if ...?" "Why wouldn't ...?" "What could you use to ...?" "What could you ... if ...?" This program targets Level 3 questions and statements.  At this level of understanding, your child will need to look beyond the material in front of him.  He will be required to evaluate and reorder the information. A typical skill in this category is the ability to exclude material. Your child will need to follow directions which may use the words ‘not, don’t, can’t, something else, other than’. The activities in this program have been designed specifically to help your child recognise alternatives. A number of Level 4 questions have been included in this program.  These tasks will prove useful for those children who are working towards a more abstract type of question. Questions at this level include Why should ...? Why shouldn’t ...? Why can ...? Why can’t ...? What could ...? How can we tell ...?  At this level of understanding, your child will need to look beyond the material in front of him/her and will then be required to evaluate and reorder the information. A typical skill in this category is the ability to exclude material.  Your child will need to follow directions which may include the words ‘not, don’t, can’t, something else, other than’.  The activities in this program have been designed specifically to help your child recognise alternatives. Example of a Level 3 Activity 1. “A cow is a farm animal. “Tell me something different that is a farm animal.” Your child is given the following possible answers: A camel - An animal but not a farm animal. A pig - The correct answer. This is an alternative farm animal. A farm - The place where farm animals are found. A lion - An animal but not a farm animal. 2. “Which animals don’t belong on the farm?” - “Camel, lion” Example of a Level 4 Activity 1.“Mum fills the kettle with water.  How can we tell that the kettle is boiling?" 2. “Frogs can jump. Why can’t snails jump?
  • What Will Happen Next?

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    Level 3

    Describing an event that might happen Level 3 “What might happen next?” “What will happen next?” “What could happen next?” Describing an event that won't happen Level 3 “What won't happen next?" "What won't the boy do next?" Reasoning, justifying and predicting Level 4 “Would a bowling ball be a bowling ball if it were made of cotton wool?” “How could the boy avoid falling off his skateboard?” “Why shouldn't the boy ride on top of the bus?” Contents - Learning to sequence is an important language component for your child. This program will help your child understand and express ordinal and causal relationships. He/she will require sequencing skills to create narratives as his/her language develops. The ability to sequence an event will help your child to organise information and ideas with greater efficiency. As you help your child to sequence stories, this program will also reinforce a number of concepts (first, last, before, after). Working through the program will serve as an early step in developing your child's ability to produce a story. Example of a task/activity Cover the two smaller pictures on the right and ask your child to describe what is happening in the large picture on the left. If your child is unable to describe the event occurring in the large picture, you should model the complete sentence for him/her.  "The boy is buying a cake." Next, cover the large picture and uncover the two smaller pictures. Point to each small picture as you ask "What's happening?" or "What happened ...?"  Encourage your child to describe what is happening in each picture. Again you should describe the event/s in the picture for your child if he/she is unable to do so. Now uncover all three pictures and ask either "What will happen next?" or "What won't happen next?" To further extend this activity you may wish to ask additional questions such as...  "What happened before ...? What happened after...? What happened first?" As a final task you may wish to cover all the pictures in the sequence and point to the left side of the page asking "Tell me the story. Tell me what happened."   (You may need to prompt your child with "next ..." and "then ...")
  • Negatives and Exclusions

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    Level 3

    Selecting an Object by Exclusion “Find something that is not …” “Tell me something that can’t ....” “Show me something that won’t ...” Citing an Example by Excluding a Class of Objects “Tell me something that grows but isn’t a plant.” “Show me something that belongs in the zoo but isn’t a tiger. “Find a food that is not a vegetable.” Citing an Example by Excluding a Specific Object “Name something that can jump but is not a horse.” “Find something that has leaves but isn’t a tree.” “Show me something that shines but isn’t a torch.” Selecting a Set of Objects by Exclusion “Show me the things that aren’t ...” “Point to the ones that don’t have wheels ...” “Find the food that isn’t ...” The worksheets in this program have been designed to help your child understand negative statements and the concept of exclusion. By working through this program, you will help your child understand that the presence of a negative in a statement generally means that the opposite is true (e.g. “The sky isn’t blue.”). Each page has three components. If your child becomes distracted easily, you should cover two thirds of the page to maintain his focus on the targeted item. Statements and instructions which target exclusion will require your child to overcome the urge to respond to a key word or salient perceptual material. Commonly used negatives are: “not, can’t, don’t, won’t, isn’t, hasn’t, doesn’t”. An additional benefit from working through these activities, is the chance to increase your child’s vocabulary. To achieve this, it is important for you to encourage your child to describe or name each picture. If your child does recognise a picture but does not know a word, you should point to the picture and say the word for him whilst encouraging him to copy what you say.