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  • Wise Words indigenous materials have been devised to support parents, teachers and clinicians who may find it challenging to teach indigenous content because of concerns that they may not have the knowledge or understanding to ensure that the books, their stories and the complexity of the information is presented in a respectful and appropriate manner. With thanks to Tara Lewis who kindly edited these resources.  Tara Lewis is a Speech Pathologist and member of Speech Pathology Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee.  Tara is an Iman woman from the Taroom country of Western Queensland. The Australian Curriculum has established Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures as a priority.  This will ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students are able to see themselves, their identities and their cultures reflected in the curriculum of each of the learning areas. Exposure to these and other indigenous books can build awareness of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures amongst all Australian children. USING BOOKS TO ENHANCE A CHILD'S UNDERSTANDING AND INCREASE HIS/HER EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE You can use a book to expand a child's • Vocabulary (gum tree, eucalyptus, ambled, burrow, stream) • Understanding of concepts (e.g. busy, quietly, frightened, impatiently, huffy) • Ability to understand questions A Home for Bilby describes the Australian bush and the habitats of the animals that live there. As the animals describe their daily lives and habitats, they develop sympathy for Bilby and help him find a home which is just right for him. Wise Words Scripts - offer clinicians, teachers and parents readily available questions designed specifically for each book.  A script provides a variety of questions at each level of understanding for each page of the book.  A teacher or clinician working with a group of children can tailor questions to each child's language ability. This script and other available scripts have been based on Marion Blank's Model of Classroom Language.
  • USING BOOKS TO ENHANCE A CHILD'S UNDERSTANDING AND INCREASE HIS/HER EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE You can use a book to expand a child's • Vocabulary (grumble, jug, goat, curtains, fleas, chasing) • Understanding of concepts (wise, curious, big. enormous, gigantic) • Ability to understand questions Wise Words Scripts - offer clinicians, teachers and parents readily available questions designed specifically for each book.  A script provides a variety of questions at each level of understanding for each page of the book.  A teacher or clinician working with a group of children can tailor questions to each child's language ability. This script and other available scripts have been based on Marion Blank's Model of Classroom Language. Marion Blank recognised the importance of keeping questions and statements within a child’s level of understanding. The more concrete the statement or question, the easier it will be for the child to understand. As questions become more abstract, they become harder for children to answer. The Blank Model is divided into 4 levels of questioning, moving from the concrete (easiest) at Level 1 to the abstract (most difficult) at Level 4.
  • Domestic Express Post $15.00 guarantees next business day delivery if a delivery address is within the Express Post network on a business day (Monday to Friday). This covers 80% of Australian business addresses, private addresses and Post Office Boxes.  The service operates between all capital cities (except Darwin and in Perth CBD only) and some major centres. If the address is outside Express Post network, it will be sent via the fastest possible transport links, but it won't be delivered by the next day. Although Australia Post Airmail Service guarantees reliable delivery to over 200 countries, customs procedures in other countries have been known to delay the delivery of packages.
  • Automatic Download Once you have purchased your program you will receive an automatic download to your provided email address.
  • Wise Words indigenous materials have been devised to support parents, teachers and clinicians who may find it challenging to teach indigenous content because of concerns that they may not have the knowledge or understanding to ensure that the books, their stories and the complexity of the information is presented in a respectful and appropriate manner. With thanks to Tara Lewis who kindly edited these resources.  Tara Lewis is a Speech Pathologist and member of Speech Pathology Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee.  Tara is an Iman woman from the Taroom country of Western Queensland. The Australian Curriculum has established Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures as a priority.  This will ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students are able to see themselves, their identities and their cultures reflected in the curriculum of each of the learning areas. Exposure to these and other indigenous books can build awareness of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures amongst all Australian children. USING BOOKS TO ENHANCE A CHILD'S UNDERSTANDING AND INCREASE HIS/HER EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE You can use a book to expand a child's • Vocabulary (world, fighting, winning, pretending, crept) • Understanding of concepts (e.g. new, many, frightened, around, lonely) • Ability to understand questions Bangu The Flying Fox details a traditional Dreaming story from the Yuin people of Wallaga Lake.  Bangu explores the importance of belonging and identification. Wise Words Scripts - offer clinicians, teachers and parents readily available questions designed specifically for each book.  A script provides a variety of questions at each level of understanding for each page of the book.  A teacher or clinician working with a group of children can tailor questions to each child's language ability. This script and other available scripts have been based on Marion Blank's Model of Classroom Language.
  • USING BOOKS TO ENHANCE A CHILD'S UNDERSTANDING AND INCREASE HIS/HER EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE You can use a book to expand a child's • vocabulary (beetroot, paddock, trotting, rope, apron, disguise) • understanding of concepts (e.g. carefully, fattest, pretty, firmly) • ability to understand questions Wise Words Scripts - offer clinicians, teachers and parents readily available questions designed specifically for each book.  A script provides a variety of questions at each level of understanding for each page of the book.  A teacher or clinician working with a group of children can tailor questions to each child's language ability. This script and other available scripts have been based on Marion Blank's Model of Classroom Language. Marion Blank recognised the importance of keeping questions and statements within a child’s level of understanding. The more concrete the statement or question, the easier it will be for the child to understand. As questions become more abstract, they become harder for children to answer. The Blank Model is divided into 4 levels of questioning, moving from the concrete (easiest) at Level 1 to the abstract (most difficult) at Level 4.
  • Wise Words indigenous materials have been devised to support parents, teachers and clinicians who may find it challenging to teach indigenous content because of concerns that they may not have the knowledge or understanding to ensure that the books, their stories and the complexity of the information is presented in a respectful and appropriate manner. With thanks to Tara Lewis who kindly edited these resources.  Tara Lewis is a Speech Pathologist and member of Speech Pathology Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee.  Tara is an Iman woman from the Taroom country of Western Queensland. The Australian Curriculum has established Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures as a priority.  This will ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students are able to see themselves, their identities and their cultures reflected in the curriculum of each of the learning areas. Exposure to these and other indigenous books can build awareness of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures amongst all Australian children. USING BOOKS TO ENHANCE A CHILD'S UNDERSTANDING AND INCREASE HIS/HER EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE You can use a book to expand a child's • Vocabulary (warrior, coast, oysters, tribes, corroborees, trade, hovering) • Understanding of concepts (e.g. often, wise, great, fresh) • Ability to understand questions Bittangabee Tribe is based around important aspects of traditional Aboriginal life.  The book describes the lives of an aboriginal family on the south coast of NSW.  The story follows the family on their annual journey into the mountains to meet with other groups and their return to their home near the sea. Wise Words Scripts - offer clinicians, teachers and parents readily available questions designed specifically for each book.  A script provides a variety of questions at each level of understanding for each page of the book.  A teacher or clinician working with a group of children can tailor questions to each child's language ability. This script and other available scripts have been based on Marion Blank's Model of Classroom Language.
  • USING BOOKS TO ENHANCE A CHILD'S UNDERSTANDING AND INCREASE HIS/HER EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE You can use a book to expand a child's • Vocabulary (stool, kennel, basket, sty, reaching, searching) • Understanding of concepts (big - little, wet - dry) • Ability to understand questions Wise Words Scripts - offer clinicians, teachers and parents readily available questions designed specifically for each book.  A script provides a variety of questions at each level of understanding for each page of the book.  A teacher or clinician working with a group of children can tailor questions to each child's language ability. This script and other available scripts have been based on Marion Blank's Model of Classroom Language. Marion Blank recognised the importance of keeping questions and statements within a child’s level of understanding. The more concrete the statement or question, the easier it will be for the child to understand. As questions become more abstract, they become harder for children to answer. The Blank Model is divided into 4 levels of questioning, moving from the concrete (easiest) at Level 1 to the abstract (most difficult) at Level 4.
  • Level 4

    Explaining an inference “How can you tell that ...?” “How do you know that ...?” Explaining obstacles to an action “Why can’t the ...?” “Why won’t the ...?" Formulating a solution “What could she do ...?” “What should the ... do ...?” Justifying a prediction “What will happen if ...?” “Why can’t ...?” “Why shouldn’t ...?” Justifying a decision - based on essential and non-essential characteristics “If a ... were ... would it still be ...?” “If a ... were made of ... would it still be ...? Working through this program will improve your child’s verbal organisation. The program will allow your child to attend to and process information, whilst retrieving and comparing this information to past experiences. Your child will need to compare the new verbal information with information which has already been stored. Each scene will offer him/her the opportunity to develop an understanding of more abstract language. It will also improve his/her ability to ignore non-relevant material, yet retain the relevant features or information from each scene. This program will target
    • Inferential Reasoning - the ability to draw a conclusion based on the facts and previous experiences.
    • Problem Solving - the ability to identify obstacles and then formulate a solution to a problem.
    • Justifying a Prediction - the ability to explain why an event may take place and why certain actions or behaviours should be avoided.
    • Justifying a Decision - based on essential and non-essential characteristics of an object.
    Example of a task/activity - The Hairdresser
    • How can you tell that the boy is having a haircut?
    • How do you know that the hairdresser hasn’t finished cutting his hair?
    • How do you know that the boy is at the hairdresser?
    • Why is the boy wearing a cape?
    • Why does the boy need to go to the hairdresser?
    • What should the hairdresser do after the boy leaves?
  • Level 4

    Explaining the Logic of Compound Words Level 4 “Why is a ... called a ...?” “Why isn’t a ... called a ...?” “Why do we call this a ... ?” A Compound Word is formed when two or more words, which can stand alone, are joined to make a new word. The new word takes on a new meaning (button + hole = buttonhole, foot + ball = football).  This program has been designed to help your child to recognise and explain the reasoning behind compound words. Explaining the logic of compound words is a Blank’s Level 4 level of understanding and makes it necessary for your child to use language to talk about language. At this level, the questions and statements pose more complex verbal problems and will require your child to reason and predict. Asking your child to explain why a ‘waterfall’ is called a ‘waterfall’ requires him/her to analyse the presented word and recognise that it is comprised of two individual words. In addition, he/she needs to understand that the individual words have different meanings when they stand alone. Example of a task/activity “Why is a rainbow called a rainbow?” You should point to the picture of the rainbow and say the following... “This is a rainbow.”  Next, you ask your child the question:  “Why is a rainbow called a rainbow?”  If his/her response is incorrect or inadequate you should point to and talk with your child about the first two smaller pictures below the rainbow.  “This is rain. A rainbow appears when it has been raining."  Next, talk about the second picture:  "Look this is a bow. A rainbow has the shape of a bow.”  Now that you have explained the two components of the word ‘rainbow', you should ask again the question relating to the compound word: “Why is a rainbow called a rainbow?” “Why isn’t a rainbow called a rain tank?” Point to the rainbow and then point to and talk about the picture of the rain tank. Ask: “Why isn’t a rainbow called a rain tank?” You may need to help your child focus on the relevant features in the picture by talking more about the rain tank. In this way you will be simplifying the question further.  
  • Level 4

    Explaining the reason for an action

    Why is the boy carrying a surfboard? Why is the boy collecting eggs? Why is the boy pushing the doorbell? Why is the girl bringing her skateboard?   Explaining an inference How can you tell that the girl might be making a snowman? How can you tell that the girl may be going to the beach? This program targets Level 4 of Marion Blank’s ‘Model of Classroom Language’.  Working through the activities provided in this program will increase your child’s understanding of ‘Why?’ questions’.  The program will support a child to understand:
    • Why a person may select a tool or object.
    • Why a person acts in a certain manner.
    The provided materials will help to establish the child's ability to problem solve and offer explanations for actions.  This program can be used with both readers and non-readers alike.  Questions are used to guide your child through the thinking process so that he will reach the appropriate conclusion without being provided with the answer. It is important for the parent, teacher or clinician to lead the child towards the salient features of the presented problem.  It may become necessary for the adult to break down the problem scenario into smaller parts to give the child the opportunity to understand.  It is then essential to talk more, at a simple level, in language that the child understands.  Rephrasing the information will ensure that the child is able to make inferences, understand the question and then offer an appropriate response.
  • Level 2

    Identifying objects according to their function/use Level 2 ““What do you use … for?” “What do you use to ...?” “What do you do with a ...?” “Find something that you can…” Scanning for an object defined by its function Level 2 “Find something that you can dig with.” “Show me something that I can use to ...” “Point to the ones that I can drink.” “Touch the ones that you can drive.” This program provides opportunities to teach more verbs and help children understand that objects have functions - Playing the games provided in this program will increase your child’s command of verbs (action words) and help to expand his/her vocabulary and sentences. Working through the provided activities will help your child understand the link between objects and functions and will ensure that he/she remains engaged in the presented tasks. Research indicates that vocabulary size is a major contributor to language development. It is important for children to make a meaningful connection between an object and an action and thus expand their vocabulary. Verbs lay the foundation for the meaning of early sentences. Providing additional connections such as understanding functions, helps a child learn and find words in a more timely manner. Example of a game: This This game does not require a die. The movement cards describe an action. These cards are cut up and placed face down in a pile next to the board. Each player takes turns to pick up a card from the pile, saying the words ... “Move to something that you can ...” The player moves his/her counter to the first square on the track which matches the action card selected. Cards are placed in the discard pile after each turn. When all the cards have been discarded, the stack should be turned over and the players continue drawing cards from the pile, creating a sentence and moving to a matching object until one player reaches the finish.
  • Level 2

    Naming the functions of objects Level 2 “What do we do with this?” “What is a ... for?” “What do we use this for?” Citing an example within a category Level 2 “Yesterday I bought something to eat.  What could I have bought?” “My naughty dog chewed my clothes.  What clothes did he chew?” These worksheets are targeted at  Level 2 of Marion Blank’s 'Model of Classroom Language'.  The activities will help your child understand the function of objects, what the objects are used for and what we do with them. Function - describes ...
    • What we do with something (eat cake).
    • What we use it for (cut with scissors).
    • What it does or what it can do (a helicopter flies, a bee can sting).
    This program ensures that your child will be able to ...
    • Select objects according to their function.
    • Sort objects with similar functions.
    • Name the functions of objects.
    • Identify the odd one out by recognising the object’s function.
    Research indicates that we store and retrieve words more easily if they have been organised into ‘groups’.  Classifying is an important skill for a child to learn.  Understanding the function of objects is generally the first characteristic that a child attaches to an object.  Your child will quickly realise that juice is for drinking and that a bed is for sleeping in. This program will help to increase your child’s vocabulary and improve his retrieval of words by creating an awareness that objects have functions.  Working through these activity sheets will assist your child to understand the functions and uses of objects.  As you work through this program, it is important that your questions and statements are adjusted so that your conversation is kept within your child’s skill level.  If your child does not appear to understand you, or he responds inappropriately to your question or statement, you should talk more about the task, the activities or objects.  This will help to increase your child’s understanding of the conversation or task.  Your language should always be explicit.  You should not assume that your child will be able to imply something from your statement unless you have explained it fully.  If your child understands the instruction, he is more likely to attend to the task and if successful, will maintain his confidence and feel encouraged to participate in further activities
  • Levels 2 - 4

    Attending to Two Characteristics Naming the Parts of Objects Identifying an Object by its Function Level 2 “Find something that is round and we can eat.” “What is this part of a ... called?” “What do we use this for?” Selecting an Object by Exclusion Selecting a Set of Objects by Exclusion Level 3 “Find all the ones that are not animals." "Tell me something that is not big." “Show me something that can jump but is not a horse." Reasoning and Problem Solving Level 4 “If a bicycle wheel were square would it still be a wheel?” “Why are gumboots made of rubber?” “What will happen if ...?” "Why is a raincoat called a raincoat?" The first part of this program has been designed to help your child recognise and name parts of objects and respond to questions which focus on the object's properties and functions. (eg Selecting an object according to two characteristics – “Find the one that has an engine and wings.”) The second part of this program targets exclusion.  This requires your child to overcome the urge to respond to a key word or salient perceptual material. (eg “Point to something that you can eat but isn’t round.  Find something that flies in the sky but doesn't have wings.”) The final part of this program represents complex verbal problems that require a child to reason about what may, might, could or would happen to material/objects under specific circumstances. Your child will need to problem solve and formulate solutions using logic and past knowledge. Although the question may relate to an object pictured on the page, the solution to the question is not present. Example of tasks/activities Level 2 Find something round which we can eat. What's this part of a helicopter called? Level 3 Point to something that you can eat but isn't round. Point to something that is a boat but doesn't have sails. Level 4 Why isn't a beach ball made of wood? Would a soccer ball still be a soccer ball if it were an oval shape?
  • Levels 2 - 4

    Level 2 Attending to Two Characteristics Naming the Parts of Objects Identifying an Object by its Function “Find something that is round and we can eat.” “What is this part of a ... called?” “What do we use this for?” Level 3 Selecting an Object by Exclusion Selecting a Set of Objects by Exclusion “Find all the ones that are not animals." "Tell me something that is not big." “Show me something that can jump but is not a horse." Level 4 Reasoning and Problem Solving “If a bicycle wheel were square would it still be a wheel?” “Why are gumboots made of rubber?” “What will happen if ...?” "Why is a raincoat called a raincoat?" The first part of this program has been designed to help your child recognise and name parts of objects and respond to questions which focus on the object's properties and functions. (eg Selecting an object according to two characteristics – “Find the one that has an engine and wings.”) The second part of this program targets exclusion. This requires your child to overcome the urge to respond to a key word or salient perceptual material. (eg “Point to something that you can eat but isn’t round. Find something that flies in the sky but doesn't have wings.”) The final part of this program - represents complex verbal problems that require a child to reason about what may, might, could or would happen to material/objects under specific circumstances. Your child will need to problem solve and formulate solutions using logic and past knowledge. Although the question may relate to an object pictured on the page, the solution to the question is not present. Example of a task/activity Level 2 Find something round which we can eat. What's this part of a helicopter called? Level 3 Point to something that you can eat but isn't round. Point to something that is a boat but doesn't have sails. Level 4 Why isn't a beach ball made of wood? Would a soccer ball still be a soccer ball if it were an oval shape?
  • Level 2 and Level 3

    Identifying Differences Level 2 "Which one is different? Which one is not the same? Which one doesn’t match? How are these different? Identifying Similarities Level 3 “How are these the same? The first activity (Level 2) - will help your child to identify differences and be able to explain how something is different. This is an important skill as it directs the child’s attention to further aspects or properties of an item. This Level 2 question is simpler than the more complex question “How are these the same?” The second activity (Level 3)  will help your child to identify similarities within a group of objects. This is an important skill for children to acquire as they are often able to recognise differences between objects and yet they cannot always explain how objects can share similarities. This Level 3 question is more complex because now your child has to perceive similarities between objects which may, or may not, be obvious or immediately perceived. Example of a Level 2 Activity: Ask your child to point to and name the objects: “Dog, duck, pig, sheep, horse” Now ask: “Which one is different?” - "Duck" If your child points to the correct item but does not verbalise, she should be encouraged to name the item. - “duck.” Point to the duck and ask: “How is it different?” - “The duck is white. The other animals are grey.” Example of a Level 3 Activity: Ask your child to point to and name the objects: "Needle, knife, scissors, apron, saw" Now cover the apron with card and whilst pointing to the remaining objects ask: "How are these the same?" - “These are sharp. An apron isn't sharp.”
  • Level 2 and Level 3

    Identifying Differences Level 2 “Which one is different?" "Which one is not the same?" "Which one doesn’t match?" "How are these different?" Identifying Similarities Level 3 “How are these the same?" The first activity (Level 2) will help your child to identify differences and be able to explain how something is different. This is an important skill as it directs the child’s attention to further aspects or properties of an item. This Level 2 question is simpler than the more complex question “How are these the same?” The second activity (Level 3) will help your child to identify similarities within a group of objects. This is an important skill for children to acquire as they are often able to recognise differences between objects and yet they cannot always explain how objects can share similarities. This Level 3 question is more complex because now your child has to perceive similarities between objects which may, or may not, be obvious or immediately perceived . Example of a Level 2 Activity Ask your child to point to and name the objects: “Dog, duck, pig, sheep, horse” Now ask: “Which one is different?” - "Duck" If your child points to the correct item but does not verbalise, she should be encouraged to name the item. - “duck.” Point to the duck and ask: “How is it different?” - “The duck is white. The other animals are grey.” Point to the duck and ask: “How is it different?” - “The duck is white.  The other animals are grey.” Example of a Level 3 Activity Ask your child to point to and name the objects: "Needle, knife, scissors, apron, saw"  Now cover the apron with card and whilst pointing to the remaining objects ask: "How are these the same?" - “These are sharp.  An apron isn't sharp.”
  • Shipping - International Express Post $50.00  guarantees delivery in 2 to 4 business days to metro areas of major international cities. Although Australia Post Airmail Service guarantees reliable delivery to over 200 countries, customs procedures in other countries have been known to delay the delivery of packages.
  • Wise Words Articulation Programs - support clinicians, teachers and parents to establish 'new' (correct) sounds into their child's speech. Each program supplies detailed instructions for every task and game. The instructions have been written in a clear manner for a non-professional to follow. Numerous games are provided. These games have been designed to be fun and interactive and will ensure that the child remains engaged and compliant. Playing the games will help the child to generalise the ‘new’ sound into their everyday speech.
  • Level 2

    Naming functions of objects Level 2 “What do you do with bubbles?” → “I blow bubbles.” “What do you use a pillow for?” → “I sleep on a pillow.” Completing a sentence Level 2 “I cut with a ...” “I wear a...” "I blow ..." Recognising the function of objects is an early concept for children. These worksheets will be useful for teaching your child how objects are used and what they are used for.  Recognising the function of objects is an early concept for children. These worksheets will be useful for teaching your child how objects are used and what they are used for. Four objects are placed on the left of each page and the matching four functions are represented on the right of the page. Your child will learn to match the action with the appropriate object and alternatively match the object with its function. This program will help your child to increase their vocabulary and understanding of verbs (action words). You will encourage your child to ‘make a sentence’ for each object they match to an action. (“I cut with a knife.”) Example of a task/activity Give your child a pencil and ask him/her to find the pictures that match. Point to the object on the left side of the page and ask: “What do you do with a knife?” “I cut with a knife.” Encourage your child to draw a line to match the object with its function. Now point to the next picture on the left side of the page and ask: “What do you do with a pillow?” “I sleep on a pillow.” Again ask your child to draw a line to match the object with its function. Continue in this manner until you have matched each object with its matching action (verb).